Log In   ·   Become A Member
http://www.hamptons.com/gallery/ads/2082.gif

Art and Automobiles

Originally Posted: May 09, 2007

Nicole B. Brewer

Anne Froman and Ruth Applehoff at the 69th Annual Guild Hall Member's Exhibition.
Photo by Katrina Lovett

Continuing to mine the wealth of the treasure trove of design influence of the "King of Streamlining" Raymond Loewy, the 20th century's most prolific industrial designer, The Parrish Art Museum hosted a weekend long display Artful Automobiles Car Show. The outdoor exhibition added an extra touch to their current show Raymond Loewy: Designs for a Consumer Culture which showcases his prodigious output, placing it in the wider context of the development of a modern aesthetic in consumer culture. In this engaging exhibition, you can view Loewy's career through an array of original drawings, models, products, advertisements, photographs, rare film footage of the designer at work and cars! In case you haven't seen the show, you will be in for a surprise to see two gleaming Studebakers in the museum's main hall.

In the parking lot on a bright sunny Saturday afternoon, crowds oohed and ahhed at the glistening vintage cars with sleek fins, space ship like hoods, all in mint condition. There were elegant 1930s era Fords that rival a Rolls Royce for sheer luxe look. Next to that one could find Studebaker convertibles just perfect for a spin along Dune Road. And there were several examples of the before-its-time Avanti which almost put Studebaker out of business. There was even a superb Kaiser, an almost forgotten luxury vehicle.

Kudos to the Parrish for helping the novice tune into the wonders and beauty of industrial design and its impact on everyday life!

Saturday night, Guild Hall presented the second half of their member's exhibition, this time showcasing last names M-Z. The gallery was filled with artists and well wishers. Ruth Applehoff presented the awards to Mark Seidenfeld, Mary Stubelek, Renate Pfleiderer, and Kevin Teare.

The wide array of works provided something for any taste as wall after wall was filled with photographs and paintings. The more abstract pieces included a wire sculpture reminiscent of a face and of the dancer that looked ready to leap off her podium. This exhibit is on display through June 2nd, drop by to take a look at the works of all of the local talents and supporters of the museum.

Noreen McCulley, Blanca Ricardo, and Elaine Dangio at the opening of The Art
of the Handbag. Photo by Katrina Lovett

Heading up the road, it was over to East End Books for the opening of "The Art of the Handbag" by Blanca Ricardo. We knew Bianca could cook after meeting her at a few of daughter Esperanza Leon's shows at Solar Gallery, but we quickly learned that she can sew as well. Beautiful hand crafted handbags filled the display space in the bookstore. The flirty toile bag is a perfect match for summer dresses. Spotting a safari themed work on the arm of guest Rita Abrams, it seems there was a wide array of designs and choices. Might be time to start our own collection.

Blanca couldn't host a party without some of her famous cooking. The tasty cookies and meatballs were perfect finger food as guests looked over the pieces as well as some of the local literary works available. Nestled in East Hampton near Blue + Cream, we suggest stopping by to pick up a great accessory for that new sundress, and maybe a new book to tuck inside and enjoy at the beach.

Corcoran Cares held their kickoff event at a Water Mill property listed for $19.9 million by Gary Depersia, Vice President of The Corcoran Group. The amazing estate was the backdrop for the first of many fundraisers to be held in the coming months across the east end benefiting local charities. Over 170 people attend the inaugural event which raised over $25,000.

Corcoran Cares is the name of the non-profit, in house organization created to support dozens of charitable and philanthropic organizations within the communities Corcoran serves. It is a personal, tangible and meaningful way to help sustain The Corcoran Group's pledge to improving the quality of life in these communities. For the Corcoran Cares recipients these contributions become more than just a check. They become a deposit in their future.

The Corcoran Cares Committee - Mary Slattery, John Halsted, Sally Van Erk, Tim
Davis, Mary Vettel, Sonja Reinholt, Karli Kittine, Gina Decker, Jennifer Russo, and
Peter McCracken. Photo by Gary Nolan

The host committee organized the event with the help of the Golden Pear Café who brought delicious appetizers, Kettle One Vodka, and Vineyard 48 of Cutchogue. Guests included homeowners and hosts of the evening Glenn and Ginny Simon, Linda Honan, Frank Percessepe, Tressa Hall, Lara Berdine, and Rick Hoffman the Regional Senior View President of The Corcoran Group.

Charity participants included The Retreat's Vanessa Petruccelli (Senior Development Associate), Elizabeth Yennie (Education Director), and Helen Atkinson-Barnes (Educator), Peconic Bay Keeper Kevin McAllister, Southampton Hospital Foundation's Nora Perry and Bob Chaloner, ARF's Director of Marketing Kristina Lange, from East End Hospice Chrissy Michne (PR Coordinator) and Priscilla Ruffin (President and CEO) were present, and Have A Heart Community Trust founder and trustee Rose Dios.

The 2007 Corcoran Cares sponsors include Manhattan Mortgage, Golden Pear Café, Vineyard 48, Watermill party Rental, Homes of the Hamptons, Southampton Press, Homes of Eastern Long Island, Herbert & Rist Liquors, Sag Harbor Florist, Kettle One Vodka, 75 Main, Tuscan House, Sant Ambroeus, Gary Nolan, and Xpressdocs.

Peter Marcell and Leonard Barton at Bravura Art and Objects. Photo by Alex Vignoli

Bravura Art and Objects in Southampton, owned by Leonard Barton and Jeffrey Katz, hosted a brilliant exhibition of Leonard's stepfather Nahum Tschacbasov, the foremost abstract surrealist of the mid 20th century. The exhibition was a brilliant display of his signature style which boldly incorporated unconventional elements including chicken wire, sandpaper and rope in the acid-resist plate-making process. His innovative approach to intaglio printmaking combined multiple etching, engraving and aquatint techniques in a mode akin to sculpting in bas relief. The exhibition draws heavily upon portfolios of his work from the late 40s.

In 1947, his dealer, Klaus Perls (Perls Galleries, NYC), published two deluxe fabric-covered leather bound portfolios each showcasing twelve limited edition prints. One portfolio featured color printed images, the other of etching/aquatints printed in black. The portfolios received much critical acclaim. "The Patriarch" image, from the black and white portfolio, was selected by Carl Zigrosser as one of the "Prints of the Year" in the 1948 Art News Annual. Tschacbasov's etchings remain unique within the corpus of American mid 20th Century printmaking. They bridge the gap between American representational traditions and the nascent years of abstract expressionism.

The show presents highlights from the iconic Perls portfolios along with several unique artist proofs, later published prints, plus drawings, scratchboards and painted works on paper that illuminate Tschacbasov's prescient vision.

Among the regular crowd of loyal devotees to the Nugent Street gallery who admire Barton's sometimes off-beat but always fascinating shows were Kimberley McSparran, Alex Vignoli, Peter Marcelle, Anthony Lombardo, Yolanda Merchant, David Slater, Fred Bernstein, Linda Rae Tepper, and Isabel Sepulveda de Scanlon.

The gallery goers headed off either to 75 Main for martinis for the party crowd or Southampton Publick House where the carnivores were able to dine for the first time in months on their delightful porch.


Nicole, an award-winning journalist, is Executive Editor & Publisher of Hamptons.com where she focuses on celebrity interviews, fine living and design, social events, fashion and beauty. She lives on the North Fork with her husband, their two daughters, and Bernese Mountain dog, Cooper. www.hamptons.com HamptonsOnline NicoleBBrewer NicoleBBrewer NicoleBBrewer




Related Articles: