Log In   ·   Become A Member

Lions Club Donates $50,000 To Stony Brook Ophthalmology For Equipment To Combat Blindness

Originally Posted: July 14, 2011


Members of the Suffolk County Lions Diabetes Education Foundation (SCLDEF) presented a $50,000 donation to the Department of Ophthalmology at Stony Brook University Medical Center. (Courtesy Photo: SBU)

Stony Brook - The Department of Ophthalmology at Stony Brook University Medical Center has received a $50,000 donation from the Suffolk County Lions Diabetes Education Foundation (SCLDEF), part of Lions Clubs International of Suffolk County. The gift will help to purchase two new state-of-the-art instruments essential to diagnosing and treating eye conditions in order to prevent blindness.

"The Department of Ophthalmology is pleased to have joined with the Lions to help assist patients in danger of becoming blind," says Patrick Sibony, M.D., Professor and Chair, Department of Ophthalmology. "By purchasing the latest visual field machine and trichomatic laser, our practice is additionally equipped to manage and treat eye conditions related to two leading causes of blindness - glaucoma and diabetes."

Dr. Sibony says that diabetes patients will particularly benefit from the new clinical equipment. Indigent and uninsured patients will benefit as well, as the Department of Ophthalmology is a primary patient referral site from a network of Suffolk County-sponsored eyecare clinics.

"One of the biggest complications of diabetes is the damage that can adversely affect the eyes," says Andy Viola, Chairman of SCLDEF. "Stony Brook's commitment to deliver comprehensive eyecare services to the entire community has made the efforts of this grant a labor of love. We are proud to be their partner in this effort."

Visual field tests are designed to map a person's visual field and document level of peripheral vision. The diagnosis and management of glaucoma critically relies on assessment of visual field status and progress. The new instrument at Stony Brook, called the Humphrey Field Analyzer II, is a visual field machine that provides quick and accurate testing and can be programmed to trend a patient's visual field history and project future vision loss.

The new trichomatic laser, called the Novus Varia laser, has a variety of indications and can be used by both glaucoma and retinal specialists. By using this state-of-the-art laser, Stony Brook specialists can treat diabetes patients with diabetic retinopathy, including those with advanced retinopathy, diabetic neovascular glaucoma, and diabetic macular edema. This laser is also used to help treat other conditions, such as proliferative retinopathy from Sickle Cell disease and acute angle closure glaucoma.

The Department of Ophthalmology is a Comprehensive Ophthalmology Service at Stony Brook University Medical Center that provides primary and tertiary clinical care to the region. Clinical programs include: Cornea-external Diseases, Diabetic Services, Glaucoma Center, Laser Vision Correction, Neuro-ophthalmology, Oculoplastics and Reconstructive Surgery, Optometric Services, Orbit, Pediatric Ophthalmology, and Retinal Diseases. One of 25 departments within Stony Brook's School of Medicine, the Department is also involved in research, education, and medical training.

The mission of the Suffolk County Lions Diabetes Education Foundation (SCLDEF) is to promote diabetes wellness through education and support services. As a community service organization, SCLDEF offers support groups, basic diet and diabetes prevention information, screenings and educational training on living well with diabetes.




Related Articles:

Guest (Richard Kudlak) from Sag Harbor, NY says::
I am not surprised to see the Lion's Club involved in such a caring way. As the largest service club organization in the world, the Lion's Club helps make a difference in communities across the country. The volunteer work of their charitable members help make the lives of many people in need just a little bit easier. Kudos to the selfless efforts of it's membership.
Jul 15, 2011 1:28 pm

 

Submit Your Comment

Please note, you are not currently logged in. Your comment will be submitted as a guest.
To submit your comment as a member, please click here.
Your Name:
Location:*
Comments:*
* Comments will be reviewed and posted in a timely fashion
* All fields are required
Question:*
What color is a banana?
(For spam prevention, thanks)