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Sandy Hollow Project Proposes Affordable Housing Options

Originally Posted: December 24, 2008

Kelly Carroll

  |   25 Comments · Print Article

Jon Sirkin, of Vesta Development Group, said there is a need for affordable housing within the town of Southampton. Photos by Kelly Carroll

Southampton - In a push to create more affordable workforce housing within the town of Southampton, the town board is looking to re-zone a parcel of land on Sandy Hollow Road in Tuckahoe to allow for the construction of 16 units, all at a price tag of less than $250,000 each.

"There is a need for workforce housing that corresponds with the goals of the master plan," asserted Jon Sirkin, of Vesta Development Group, which will be responsible for the development of the housing project known as Sandy Hollow Cove.

Southampton attorney David Gilmartin told the town board
Friday that Vesta's affordable housing plan has the support of
both the North Sea and Tuckahoe CAC's.

At a town board meeting Friday, Dec. 19, Southampton attorney David Gilmartin presented the plans for the workforce housing project on behalf of Vesta. According to Gilmartin, the development, which will be fully backed with private funding, will be consistent with the town's master plan, sporting the architectural look and elements of the surrounding area.

The 16 units are planned to be constructed in four buildings on roughly 2.61 acres located on 161 Sandy Hollow Road. Each unit will be 1,150 square feet in size with two bedrooms and two bathrooms. Although not decided upon just yet, the units will either be offered as condominiums or cooperative-type ownership, Gilmartin said. He added that the plan has the approval of both the North Sea and Tuckahoe Citizen Advisory Committees.

But it wasn't all good news as Southampton Town Planning and Development Administrator Jefferson Muphree told members of the town board that a report from the planning board showed some reservations with the project.

Although the planning board was pleased with the intent of the project, Murphree recounted that the members noted that the construction would make for a "tight project," putting a chunk of development on a small amount of land.

In the plans, all parking is oriented toward the front of the units, and according to Murphree, the planning board was concerned about headlights shinning into the units' windows. The board raised questions over the designed entrance signs, asked for more access to public transportation, and suggested the installation of a playground for children living in the development. Gilmartin did not say that any of these issues would pose a problem.

The property on Sandy Hollow Road, currently zoned R-80 for residential use, would be rezoned as a Residential Planned Development District specifically for this project.

According to the developers, ownership of each unit will be decided through a lottery system. Each prospective buyer will have to present a pre-commitment letter from a reputable bank to assure that they will be able to buy the unit if chosen. In partnership with the Community Development Corporation of Long Island, Sirkin estimated that eight units will be offered at $160,000, four will be offered at $210,000 and another four will be at $240,000. The units will be green compliant, and some will be set aside for area first-responders.

The Southampton Town Board scheduled a continuation hearing to continue review of the project for Tuesday, Jan. 13 at 1 p.m


The 16 units are planned to be constructed in four buildings on roughly 2.61 acres located on 161 Sandy Hollow Road. Each unit will be 1,150 square feet in size with two bedrooms and two bathrooms.




Guest (north sea) from north sea says::
the density for this project is too high, and a change in zoning to allow a developer to make a profit under the guise of "affordable housing" is bordering on the criminal. While there is definitely a need for more affordable housing for our local folks, overbuilding is not the answer.
Jan 2, 2009 12:00 am

Guest (southamptonresident-15 years) from North Sea says::
DOESN'T ANYONE UNDERSTAND WHAT THE TERM "AFFORDABLE HOUSEING MEANS"...we have 250 "affordable condos on MAJORS PATH" another 250 are GOING TO BE BUILT BEHIND THEM!!!" The LIE IS THE TERM IN AND OF ITSELF "AFFORDABLE" THE TOWN BOARD SHOULD BE LOOKING OUT FOR THE PEOPLE OF THE COMMUNITIES OF SOUTHAMPTON TOWN NOT BARTERING WITH PROFITEERS!!!
Jan 1, 2009 7:37 am

Guest (local teacher) from southampton says::
I agree that workforce housing is absolutley needed in our area. How can you tell a person who has worked hard to earn two college degrees and begin a career as an educator that their only option is to go across the canal and buy a house in Hampton Bays or Flanders? You are saying that it is acceptable that we cannot afford to live in the East End communities we work in??? That being said, we can surley come up with a better solution than packing sixteen residences on a tiny lot. This is a band-aid, not a solution. These are condos. What about houses? In Southold town, they had an affordable housing lottery of actual small homes for workforce housing. Our workforce deserves more than just a large apartment as an option.
Dec 31, 2008 6:01 pm

Guest (Fish Nut) from Easthampton says::
Are there any measures in place to keep these units as affordable housing after the first owner sells? Or, are the first buyers going to be able to sell the unit for a profit (the american dream) and become greedy profiteers, which is what the "locals" call any one who wasn't born here when they makes money in the real estate market.
Dec 31, 2008 12:00 am

Guest (Former Resident, Former Volunteer/Friends of Hampton Library) from Southampton, NY says::
This is more than welcome - and overdue. In adding these homes, the developer will help our community begin to become a bit more well-rounded (and without the risk of typical worries associated with affordable housing - not by any stretch being a 'project'). Being ownership homes vs. rentals is attractive, and 16 homes in four buildings on 2.6 acres is hardly dense population. It could save the residency of locals who live and work here and contribute to our continuity and history when so many are forced to leave due to high costs of housing and living.
Dec 30, 2008 11:31 pm

Guest (rick w.) from Hampton Bays says::
I'd like to ask "Lifelong SH resident" OR the attorney for the case (if they are not one and the same) what is the monthly maintenance fees for these coops? And what exists on the adjoining lands? Also, why was the speaker at the hearing not identified as the son of George Moore?
Dec 30, 2008 7:40 pm

Guest (hamptosn surfer) from southampton says::
32 cars? there are 10 cars at one 'affordable' rental in shinnecock hills..try 200 cars. and, try another 150 new students in tuckahoe. yeah, we need this. like a hole in the head.
Dec 30, 2008 6:53 pm

Guest (tuckahoe) from Tuckahoe says::
The Town spent $3 million for a parcel with taxpayer money, earmarked for affordable housing, just across Cty Rd 39. Why are they not using that? This is too much density for a small lot. The fact that they need zoning relief to set the buildings just 35 feet from Sandy Hollow and that residents wont be permitted to make a left turn out of their shared driveways indicates that this is a poorly conceived design. The law firm pushing this has a reputation for making money on projects that are bad for the community. (Woodfield Gables, nightclubs, code violators) If this overcrowded design was proposed next door to the lawyer or the developer's home, they'd probably be the first ones suing to stop it. Let us hope the Town Board works on responsible affordable housing projects instead of this ill-conceived one.
Dec 29, 2008 8:13 am

Guest (North Sea Citizen) from North Sea says::
The Town has already addressed living by allowing accessory apartments, so there is no shortage of living quarters. This project is too dense and Sandy Hollow Road is a gateway to North Sea and I would rather look at a single family homes than a condo complex. A single family home provides lots of building and importantly service jobs and pays alot of taxes. There are more than a dozen homes available in Hampton Bays, East Quogue and Flanders priced under $275,000 so where would you rather live in a box or a house?? As far as affordability, prices have increased everywhere and no one said the American dream was easy. I have worked two jobs and or double shifts for a long time, as well as rented for 15 years until I could save enough to buy, but I did it and so can anyone else. If you want to stay or live somewhere you can, you just have to be willing to work for it. As far as losing First Responders why not start a visible recruitment call in the Newspapers and local radio stations, put a big sign or banner in front of the FD or Ambulance barn. You may just surprise yourself and find people willing to sign up filling the void. Alot of people are not aware that there is a staffing shortage as it seems to be kept mostly word of mouth. Call the project what it is. An overly dense condo project which will add more density to an already dense hamlet.
Dec 29, 2008 12:00 am

Guest (James) from North Sea says::
Sounds like a good idea. Check out the drawing in the guy's hand - looks like ample space for the units and parking, even allows plenty of green space. This plot is over 2.5 acres - my house sits on a quarter acre and is decent size. And hey, developers have been milking the Hamptons for years - at least these guys' project has redeeming social value, not another McMansion that will be occupied 3 months a year. If we can bring in affordable housing with private funding (saving our tax dollars) I'm all for it. I can't see why locals would rather see 2 more million+ dollar homes on this plot. Do people want SH to become strictly a resort town?
Dec 28, 2008 11:12 pm

Guest (tim corwin) from southampton says::
A minimum of 64 people and 32 cars is WAY to much to stick on a 2 1/2 acre lot which should have only one home on it. Personally, I wouldn't want to live there. There is plenty of affordable housing available in flanders and Hampton Bays.
Dec 28, 2008 7:52 pm

Guest (Lifelong Southampton Resident) from Southampton, ny says::
First of all, the argument that the addition of 30+ more cars to the road will have any meaningful impact on traffic conditions is ridiculous. Hundreds of cars come onto Sandy Hollow Road every day; 30 more will not even be noticed. Being a responsible community involves responding to pressing issues and concerns. The fact these incredible important members of our town – people that serve our needs every day – can’t afford to live here is disgusting. We need to act and this plan is a great opportunity. If, as suggested, the Town were to instead buy up homes around Southampton it would cost millions and millions of dollars – this plan costs nothing. The project is an important and cost effective first step in ensuring that getting a home in Southampton is a basic joy and not a lifelong struggle.
Dec 28, 2008 1:44 pm

Guest (local man) from southhampton says::
WE NEED THIS PROJECT. I KNOW A LOT OF PEOPLE IN THEIR 20'S WHO ARE PAYING MORE THAN HALF THEIR INCOME IN RENT AND CAN'T AFFORD TO BUY ANYTHING. ONE AFTER ANOTHER I WATCH THEM LEAVE FOR SOMEWHERE MORE AFFORDABLE UP ISLAND OR EVEN OUT OF STATE. THESE ARE THE PEOPLE WHO HAVE JOBS HERE AND WANT TO STAY. FOR A COMMUNITY TO PROSPER IT NEEDS PEOPLE WHO LIVE IN IT AND HAVE PRIDE IN THEIR HOMES AND NOT JUST PEOPLE WHO ARE STRUGGLING TO PAY RENT OR SECOND HOMEOWNERS. I CAN'T IMAGINE THAT ANY LOCAL RESIDENT WHO GREW UP HERE AND LIVES IN THIS TOWN WOULD BE AGAINST THIS PROJECT OR ANY OTHERS THAT CREATE ALL AFFORDABLE HOUSING.
Dec 28, 2008 11:27 am

Guest (tuckahoe) from Tuckahoe says::
The town is changing the zoning here to allow for 16 homes on a parcel that is zoned for two. They will allow a developer to make millions on an overcrowded subdivision. This is not a responsible way to enact affordable housing. The town should buy existing housing and add it to the inventory instead.
Dec 28, 2008 10:03 am

Guest (Resident) from Southampton says::
This project addresses a dire need in a town that now prices out successive generations of its remaining working-class families. The workers who grew up in and now serve this community deserve a chance to live here as their parents and grandparents have. As for traffic, the impact would likely be negligible. These are 16 fairly small units in a development with a single point of access to the broad Sandy Hollow road - not apartment towers or a buzzing commercial development. Certainly this slight concern does not warrant denial of affordable housing to this town's teachers, nurses, police officers, etc.
Dec 27, 2008 8:02 pm

Guest (southamptonresident) from southampton says::
To Richard: there are homes available in Hampton Bays and Flanders with the same prices as these condos, plus there isn't a high monthly maintenance fee that come with all condos. This is too much jammed on one small lot. The only speaker in favor at the hearing was a buddy of the developers, the son of the realtor connected to the deal.
Dec 27, 2008 3:53 pm

Guest (Gladis) from Southampton, NY says::
This is a wonderful project that I think all East Enders should support. Regular, hard-working people are getting priced out of their own communities, and finally the town is doing something about it. I hope this is just a start! We should all be a lot more concerned about the lack of affordable housing in Southampton and the ability of first responders to actually live here, than worrying about a few extra cars on the road in Tuckahoe.
Dec 27, 2008 12:00 am

Guest (craig) from Southampton says::
I have lived here for 15 years and have systematically watched as my friends, who are all local, have moved away from the area, into either surrounding areas or away all together because they could not afford to buy a house here. We are in desperate need of affordable housing to allow locals to stay in their hometown. The comments about an extra traffic are completely invalid, thousands of vehicles travel into this area each day, an extra 30 will have next to no impact. Please show reason and wisdom in making the right decision and maybe we can create more of these small communities which will help maintain the true community that seems to be dwindling away.
Dec 27, 2008 12:00 am

Guest (Farglesbury Hamperdonk) from Southampton, NY says::
People are against this because of the traffic??? 32 More cars? How many cars go up and down 39 and 27 each summer? and you are worried about 32 more cars? that is a poor argument. Traffic watcher, i know, based on your name, that roughly .0001% more cars on the road will probably ruffle the heck out of your feathers. But I am a little more worried about the fact that cops, fire fighters and EMS workers won't be able to afford to live out here unless we raise taxes to pay them enough, (I'll repeat that: NO FIREMENT, NO EMS CAN AFFORD TO LIVE OUT HERE ------ TAXES WILL BE MUCH HIGHER.) or they marry into your, im sorry, the oligarchical plutocracy that is trying to halt this project. Furthermore, how many more cars will be on the road when every year round service employee has to drive out from patchogue to get to work? What if everyone, except those of you who come out a few weekends a year to pay people who cant afford to live out here, has to drive from Patchogue? Probably a few thousand people. Employees will need to drive out here no matter what. and the traffic will start around exit 58 or 59 now instead.
Dec 27, 2008 12:00 am

Guest (Southamptonresident) from Shinnecock Hills says::
Why be surprised by the term 'first responders'? How about the term workforce housing? All these terms all but guarantee that minorirites will not be living in these areas anytime soon. No wonder we all live in the 2nd racist area in the country.
Dec 26, 2008 10:12 pm

Guest (Local Gut) from Tuckahoe says::
Has anyone done the math? As noble as this sounds, the dollars speak for themselves. The two allowed homes in that neighborhood might net two million. But sixteen homes jammed onto two acres at an average price of 200 k would yield 3.2 million. Sounds like a town endorsed savior and windfall for some developer who might otherwise be faced with the current housing slowdown in the million dollar home market
Dec 26, 2008 7:27 pm

Guest (traffic watcher) from Southampton, NY says::
This is crazy: cars barreling down the "backroads" route from East Hampton and Sag Harbor just zoom past the intersection and will now have to deal with 32 cars (more if the residents of this development have guests) joining the traffic flow or, even worse, turning left (north) toward the intersection. When this parcel was a vegetable stand it created enough traffic and dangerous situations. Now it would become a permanent risk. Doesn't anyone on the Town Board or planning department have common sense about this issue?
Dec 26, 2008 11:28 am

Guest (Southamptonresident) from Shinnecock Hills says::
To put four buildings with four homes in each is far too large for a two acre lot. (This is now zoned for just two houses.) If the Town Board approves a change of zone to allow more, there should be no more than six units permitted.
Dec 26, 2008 8:43 am

Guest (Richard) from Southampton, NY says::
As a 26 year old with a decent well paying job in Southampton I am very much in support of this project. After paying way to much money to rent an illegal basement apartment in Hampton Bays I have now moved in with the roommates simply because there is no where affordable to live. Even though I have saved money for a down payment there is no where in Southampton that is even close to my budget. It does say in the article that the units will be sold through a lottery.
Dec 26, 2008 12:00 am

Guest (north sea citizen) from north sea says::
The project is overly dense and will add additional traffic to an already busy road. In addition while it sounds noble to give a few to first responders that seems to discriminate against all in need. It should be given by lottery to those who need it without regard for their volunteer work or occupation. I have mixed emotions over this as no one helped me or my wife and we each worked two jobs to get where we are today. So where was my help? It really needs to go to those who really need it and not those who are able to work, perhaps two jobs, to get a home of there own and we have lots of needy people in the town.
Dec 25, 2008 12:00 am

 

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